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Refresh your browser page to run scripts and reload content. Click the Internet Zone. If you do not have to customize your Internet security settings, click Default Level. Lord John Grey. Prussia , London, England , Other Editions Friend Reviews. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Lord John and the Hand of Devils , please sign up. I'd like to buy this book, in ebook form epub , but every link is dead. It isn't on Google Play book, nor on Kobo's site, or any of the links here or those on Diana Gabaldon's own site.

Does anybody know why?

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See 1 question about Lord John and the Hand of Devils…. Lists with This Book. Community Reviews. Showing Rating details. More filters. Sort order. Shelves: short-stories , mysteries-thrillers-horror , , historical. This collection of 3 stories one short story and 2 novellas is a must-have for all Lord John fans.

It took me some time to figure out how these stories should be placed in relation to the 2 Lord John novels, so here is the order to save you trouble: Lord John and the Hellfire Club short story Lord John and the Private Matter novel Lord John and the Succubus novella Lord John and the Brotherhood of the Blade novel Lord John and the Haunted Soldier novella The Custom of the Country nov This collection of 3 stories one short story and 2 novellas is a must-have for all Lord John fans. It took me some time to figure out how these stories should be placed in relation to the 2 Lord John novels, so here is the order to save you trouble: Lord John and the Hellfire Club short story Lord John and the Private Matter novel Lord John and the Succubus novella Lord John and the Brotherhood of the Blade novel Lord John and the Haunted Soldier novella The Custom of the Country novella printed in Warriors Overall, the collection is a nice addition to the series.

The ending of it is however mentioned in the 1st Lord John novel. It has a little bit of mysticism in it and introduces a character of Austrian officer Stephan Von Namtzen, another Gabaldon favorite of mine possibly gay, naturally. Shelves: short-stories.


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I rarely read short stories so my rating probably reflects my impatience at the brevity of these tales. I've just finished Dragonfly in Amber Outlander 2 and picked up this Lord Grey book while waiting for Voyager Outlander 3 to be available at my library. Gabaldon tantalisingly drops the name 'Jamie Fraser' in each of the three stories and that itself was enough to keep me reading. Hellfire Club: After an acquaintance is murdered, an event whch John Grey witnesses, he finds himself inexpl I rarely read short stories so my rating probably reflects my impatience at the brevity of these tales.

Hellfire Club: After an acquaintance is murdered, an event whch John Grey witnesses, he finds himself inexplicably drawn into the ill-reputed Hellfire Club where he discovers secrets he'd never imagined. The succubus is a demon spirit who hunts men as they dream, taking the form of a human woman in order to seduce the men and taking their seed and their lives.

After one soldier's ravaged body is found, rumours abound through the ranks and John is embroiled in an effort to find the assailant and quell the men's fears. I found this to be thoroughly engrossing and at times amusing. European folkore, superstition, life of men in the troop's in s, the Prussian nobility; this was quite the pick of the three stories.

But all is not as it seems as John discovers there is real evidence of actual treason behind the accident. As he struggles to solve the mystery, John sees a long-dead lieutenant rumoured to appear only at specific times. His investigations lead him to a woman shunned by her family and it seems he is being trailed by a man who has no face. View all 3 comments. Sep 06, Christine AR rated it really liked it Shelves: historicalfiction. A collection of three novellas. I wasn't too impressed then, and upon re-reading it's still just meh.

However, as it's the first Lord John story, it's worth reading. The second, Lord John and the Succubus, comes between the two Lord John novels and explains his relationship with Namtzen. It was okay as a mystery, but I wish I'd read it before the novel it precedes. The third, Lord John and the A collection of three novellas. The third, Lord John and the Haunted Soldier, was really, really enjoyable. It takes place after the last book, and John is recovering from battle wounds while looking into possible espionage.

I liked the mystery, and I thought there was some fantastic character development here. I've discovered that with this particular series, I don't really care how good the storyline is, because Lord John himself, the way Gabaldon writes him, has become one of my favorite fictional characters. I really, really hope she lets John get over Jamie. I totally get that in the book universe, Jamie is the Ultimate Male, but he's also the straight guy whose relationship with his wife is the one, perfect, literally timeless Love Story of the AGES.

I live for subtext and even I can see there's no hope here. Just give the guy a break, already. Shelves: historical-fiction , lgbt-fiction , heac-big-city-setting , read , mystery. I'm not sure if it's the shortest story she's ever written, but it's by far the shortest one by her I've read to date. In this novella, she's taken Lord John Grey, a popular secondary character from the Outlander series, and given him a mystery to solve, thereby turning him into an amateur sleuth, which is what I understand he'll be doing throughout the series. It takes place in London sometime after Lord John's return from his time as warden at Ardsmuir Prison where Jamie was held.

Harry Quarry, the warden who preceded Lord John, is also a part of the story. He and John share a loose friendship and he's related to the murdered man. The plot is a fairly simple and straightforward one. John is approached by a man he's barely met, asking for a clandestine meeting to discuss something of import that he can trust to no one else, but before the meeting can take place, the man is stabbed almost before John's eyes and dies in his arms.

John vows to find the killer, which leads him to a surprising meeting of a secret society know at the Hellfire Club. As usual Diana Gabaldon has done an exceptional job with her research. Hellfire Clubs actually did exist during that time period, and Sir Francis Dashwood's, the one which John attends, appears to have been the most famous.

I also found it interesting to learn more about the perceptions of gay men in that era. Of course, John, out of necessity for his own safety, keeps his sexuality a closely guarded secret, but we do get hints of how he gets around the social mores of the day to engage in intimacies and how he views society's attitudes toward men like him. I felt rather bad for John, because he still pines for Jamie even though he's trying to set aside that unrequited love.

The main reason this was a four-star read for me instead of higher is that parts of the story didn't seem to flow as well as the Outlander books I've read. The details of the first chapter weren't quite gelling in my mind's eye the way this author's work usually does. I had to concentrate pretty intently to fully grasp the situation. Also, Ms. Gabaldon is a highly intelligent person, and it definitely shows in her writing. That's great, except that in this story, she uses more historically accurate language in both her dialogue and prose.

This made it a bit more challenging to read, because the dialogue is unfamiliar to my modern ear, and while normally I can pick up on the meaning of unfamiliar words in context, some of the words in the prose still remained a mystery to me. The mystery was handled well, especially for such a short format. It was a good start to the series, and I look forward to reading more about Lord John's adventures.

Much like with the first novella in this book, the story was rather slow-paced and occasionally I was having trouble following it. Now I admit that it could have been that through part of it I was very sleepy and kept dozing off, and through another part, I was repeatedly interrupted by my family members, so the fault may be partly mine, which is why I only marked it down one star. However, this one seemed a bit more steeped in military history surrounding the Seven Years War, with some geography, troop positions, etc.

I did, however, enjoy the mystery. The title of the novella might lead some readers to believe that this is a supernatural mystery, but the paranormal really only comes into play in the form of legends and superstition. The gist of this part of the story is that Lord John, in his capacity as a liaison officer with the English forces who are allied with the Prussians and Hanoverians, becomes aware of the murder of a Prussian soldier. However, to appease them, he allows the use of his horse in a graveyard ritual, during which the body of an English soldier is also discovered.

This leads John to investigate a possible connection between the two cases in an effort to bring an end to the speculation regarding a succubus. While solving the mystery, John is drawn into some interesting interactions with several secondary characters. He and some other high-ranking officers are staying at the castle of a widowed princess. Also, the author toys with the reader regarding a possible relationship between John and his dashing Hanoverian friend, Stephan von Namtzen, who was introduced in the previous book, Lord John and the Private Matter.

Then John meets a young teenage soldier out in the field, who he realizes is also gay. This story makes it seem like it was simply something that happened that he quickly moved on from, but I think it could definitely be an interesting aspect of his character to explore in more depth if the author chooses to go that way. Gabaldon expands upon it later. Overall, Lord John and the Succubus was an enjoyable novella. Therefore, I look forward to continuing on with the series soon, and since the next book is a full-length one, perhaps it will be even better.

Lord John and the Succubus was originally published in the multi-author anthology Legends II: New Short Novels by the Masters of Modern Fantasy and was later reprinted in this single-author anthology along with two other companion novellas in the Lord John Grey series. I enjoyed Lord John and the Haunted Soldier better than the first two novellas in this anthology. So overall, Lord John and the Haunted Soldier held my attention equally as well as the novels have so far.

The Commission seems to be insinuating that John made a mistake which led to the cannon being destroyed, or even perhaps his half-brother, Edgar, who makes the powder for the cannon might have had something to do with it. The two investigations end up intersecting in surprising ways. The more personal side of the investigation leads to a sad and twisted tale of unrequited love.

I enjoyed both because they kept me guessing and wondering what new connections John might find next. Throughout all this John continues to deal with the pain and fear of death associated with a piece of shrapnel still lodged in his chest. He also continues to pine for Jamie, regrets the heated the words they exchanged in the last book, and finds comfort in writing letters to his old friend. The only reason I knocked off the half star is because there were one or two plot points that were a tad hard to follow and a couple of places that were just a little slow, but otherwise, Lord John and the Haunted Soldier was a very good read.

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John is an excellent hero who I very much look forward to reading more about in the coming stories. May 19, Paul E. Jul 14, Sarah rated it really liked it. I loved this book! As an avid read of the Outlander series as well as a fan of the Starz series, I just had to read the Lord John series as well. Personally Lord John is one of my favorite characters in the series.

I have read the first two Lord John novels preceding this one Lord John and the Private Matter and Lord John and the Brotherhood of the Blade and each time I am drawn in by Gabaldon's writing and the development she has provided for his character. In each of the novels what I find a I loved this book!

In each of the novels what I find appealing is that Lord John Grey is not only an aristocratic soldier, but he is also gay which quite often places him in precarious situations given the time period and the constant threat of being exposed. He also has a very entertaining sense of humor and wit which makes the books crackle with intelligence but also a sense of sarcasm that kept me wanting to read more. Similar to the previous novels, this book placed John in different mysteries that he finds himself wrapped up in.

This book was a compilation of three short stories so each mystery stood alone but at the same time some of the characters and story lines within each story continued. For example, Gabaldon always has a knack for including Jamie Fraser even if it is just a name drop and many of the people that John meets throughout each of the stories has recurring role. Overall I suggest the Lord John series for anyone who is a fan of the Outlander series or just likes a good but quick mystery story now and again. The mysteries are not classic thrillers but they are entertaining and provide another insight into the 18th Century and the role of a soldier.

View all 5 comments. Jun 21, Gaijinmama rated it it was amazing. Yes, Lord John is gay. Deal with it, or maybe give this book a miss. As Lord John and most of my gay friends in real life would probably agree, his sexual orientation is not the center of the story, but it's an important aspect of who he is and how he sees the world.

While he certainly cannot be open about it as a military man in the 18th century, he is brutally honest with himself. Sharing his thoughts and observations is always a fascinating ride. In the first story, "Lord John and the Hellfire Club", he infiltrates a secret occult society that actually existed at the time, and solves a murder. In the second, "Lord John and the Succubus", he battles a vengeful demon, fends off the advances of a persistent widow, and develops a major crush on a tall, blond German officer.

In the last, "Lord John and the Haunted Soldier", he is drawn into a web of tragic, star-crossed love, political intrigue, and lots of really cool explosions and details on how gunpowder was made in the 18th century. This book is completely different from the Outlander series. Especially if the ongoing romance of Jamie and Claire isn't your cup of Earl Grey, please give Lord John a try, and give yourself a chance to enjoy Gabaldon's great writing talent.

Jan 22, Candice rated it liked it. John Grey is one of my favorite fictional characters ever, so to say I have mixed feelings about the Lord John series is a bit of an understatement. I love reading about Grey's life when he isn't with Jamie and Claire the main characters from the Outlander series where Grey is a secondary character. But I'm completely thrown by the stories themselves. They're set up as mysteries, which is fine, but the cast seems to number thousands, and by the time we get to the point where the mystery is sol John Grey is one of my favorite fictional characters ever, so to say I have mixed feelings about the Lord John series is a bit of an understatement.

They're set up as mysteries, which is fine, but the cast seems to number thousands, and by the time we get to the point where the mystery is solved, I've forgotten who half the people are and why they're important or not , and sometimes even what exactly Grey is trying to figure out, what with all the subplots and doublebacks and loops. But John Grey is fascinating, as a gay aristocratic soldier living at a time when gay sex was a crime punishable by death. I really like the characters who show up regularly - Grey's older brother, his valet, and even Jamie Fraser on occasion.

I wanted to see more of Jamie since he's the love of Grey's life, but the few times he showed up felt a bit forced. And I must admit I really dislike the person Jamie becomes around Grey, so far in the series. So, for a glimpse into the life of a smart, rich, handsome, politically-connected gay Englishman in the 17th century, I'm guessing these books are unequaled. As murder mysteries or whatever Apr 19, Sophia rated it really liked it Shelves: historical-mystery-suspense , miltary-romance-contemp-fut-hist.

In an effort to read the Lord John Grey series in order, I have not read this anthology of short story and novellas together, but rather where they fall in the story time line. I love John Grey's character in the Outlander series and was so pleased to see that he had his own stories. The first story in this book, Lord John and the Hellfire Club, was a nice introduction and reminder of his character while posing a nice murder mystery plot. John has just returned to London and visits a few of his o In an effort to read the Lord John Grey series in order, I have not read this anthology of short story and novellas together, but rather where they fall in the story time line.

John has just returned to London and visits a few of his old haunts meeting an old army friend. He is still raw from his experiences with the Scottish prisoner and sees hints of the man at every turn. But soon his thoughts have a new direction when a newly made acquaintance asks for a private interview and then gets murdered almost before his very eyes. John agrees to inquire into the matter of the young man's death and the trail leads to unexpected people and place. I found it engaging and it has whetted my appetite for the rest of the stories.

Now that was a nice atmospheric mystery set just after the events of Lord John and the Private Matter.

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John becomes the liaison between the English army and the Prussians in their war against the French and the Austrians near a small town in Germany. Things are going until a rumor of a Succubus breaks out and men start cropping up dead. Between negotiating this superstition, intrigue in the castle where he resides and worrying about the location of the enemy, John has his hands full.

My only niggle was the ending was abrupt like you get in a shorter story, but nothing to upsetting. It was another enjoyable installment in the series.


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For a novella, this one was charged with the danger, tension and internal turmoil that the author is good at. There was the mystery of the sabotage and the accusations that were flung at him going on, but John was also commissioned to discover the whereabouts of a dead lieutenant's woman. This story was very much a follow up to certain events near the end of 'Lord John and the Brotherhood of the Blade' so I don't want to get detailed and spoil it for anyone.

Suffice to say, it was a gripping, entertaining read that was just one more wonderful story in the Lord John series. These are well worth it and to skip them would to missing out on a good part of Lord John's ongoing story. Update: I did a re-read listen to this book with the talented Jeff Woodman narrating. I really do enjoy his voice work for John and all the regular characters of this series.

John is a thoughtful person, his valet Tom is sharp and eager, Harry is bluff and engaging, and the German accents during the Succubus tale were good. Woodman captures the voices and stories so well There were some editing issues where phrases were repeated now and again. But, it was a delight to listen to these three stories and the author's note with as much interest as the first time.

View 2 comments. Hell was filled with clocks, he was sure of it. There was no torment, after all, that could not be exacerbated by a contemplation of time passing. Each of these three is a mystery and has at its heart Lord John Grey, while Jamie Fraser shows up in some peripheral — but entertaining — role. In my head, Lord John, is a foppis Hell was filled with clocks, he was sure of it.

In my head, Lord John, is a foppish and superficial figure; perhaps that is in comparison with Jamie Fraser, a large, courageous, honorable, and comely lad. Despite the foppish presentation, Lord John is a major in the British army. He is a logical detective as mysteries appear, dogged in finding an answer, even when he is hungry and dead tired, even when pursuit of the truth puts him at risk.

He is honorable, even when surrounded by people who are far from honorable. I cling to the thought of Simon Coles. His goodness, his idealism—foolish though it may be—is a single bright spot in the dark quagmire of this wretched business. God knows I am neither ignorant nor innocent of the ways of the world.

And yet I feel unclean, so much evil as I have met tonight. It weighs upon my spirit; thus I write to cleanse myself of it.


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  5. This contradiction between surface appearance and core is part of what makes Lord John a compelling figure. I am also a sucker for a mystery that is more intellectual than physical, particularly when the detective discovers the mystery and does what he knows is right, even when not being entreated or paid. Mar 19, Mary rated it it was amazing Shelves: mystery , audible , historical-fiction , lgbtq. I really enjoyed this audible collection of historical mystery short stories and novella by Diana Gabaldon, featuring Lord John, a character from her Outlander series which made my long commute bearable.

    Apr 24, Delta rated it really liked it Shelves: military-paramilitary , novella , half-star , witches-sorceress , ghost-banshee , s , m-m. May 08, Jane rated it really liked it. Do you have to be a Lord John Grey fan to read this book? I think not. Or not even, possibly, a fan of Gabaldon's Outlander series, although if you're not there will be one or two references to red hair that might confuse you. This collection of three stories one short, one long-short-story length and one novella is a decent introduction to Lord John and to Gabaldon's 18th century.

    As Lord John and the Hand of Devils is a story collection it obviously lacks the coherence of the novel; there is a vague theme of the supernatural which is almost abandoned in the third and best story, Lord John and the Haunted Soldier. The stories also lack the long, inventive sex scenes that are a Gabaldon hallmark, and don't suffer from the omission. They carry forward the central problem of Lord John's existence as a gay career soldier in a world where "don't ask, don't tell" is most definitely a survival tactic, and I like the fact that two of the stories The Succubus and The Haunted Soldier show Lord John in his day job as an artillery major.

    I really liked The Haunted Soldier because it has everything in it that pleases me about Gabaldon complex, subtle plot, a hint of dry humor, a wonderful sense of being in the 18th century without overdoing it and an excellent command of both dialogue and action and it contributes depth and pathos to Lord John's wonderfully conflicted character. He's a man who loves men and thrives in a man's world, written by a woman who obviously loves men and thrives in a man's world, and this balance of hidden urges and a commonsense approach to everyday life is rather irresistible.

    Had the book been comprised of just this story I might have given it 5 stars, because it's the nearest Gabaldon's come to blowing me out of the water, but I'm holding back because the other two stories, although good, didn't pack the same wallop. Dec 18, Richard Derus rated it liked it. Rating: 3. I fall on the non-hollerin' end of category A. I like these people, Lord John especially having a claim on me because he's a shirt-lifter or Warmbruder, depending on where we are geographically.

    One was written for this Rating: 3. One was written for this collection. Does it matter what they're about? Lord John, in peace or at war, will never suffer a wrong he can right to go unrighted; he will never allow personal comfort or convenience to stand in the way of what duty and honor require him to do; and he will never fall out of love with Jamie Fraser, featured in Gabaldon's main time travel romance series as the husband of the time traveler.

    So he don't get none. Relax, ewww-ickers.

    Lord John Grey Series

    Anyway, in a marketplace crowded with mystery choices, and quite a fair few eighteenth-century historicals at that, why choose these books with their serviceable writing? Bruce Alexander, for one example, is a better writer. His Blind Justice series is very good. Simple: Depth. Lord John Grey is part of a well-known alternate world.

    It's obvious that Gabaldon could act as a tour guide to eighteenth-century England and Scotland, and it's obvious that SOMEwhere in a properly ordered Creation, Jamie and Claire and Lord John are plying their different courses through the time streams. The reason to read this series starts and stops with an individual's familiarity with or receptivity to Gabaldon's world. If you've read Dragonfly in Amber and did not find it so tedious and plodding as to make you beg a merciful Goddess for death or blindness, you're likely to enjoy these books.

    Oh, sure. Why not. Start with these novellas and see if the character appeals; if so, the novels await your pleasure. The drums were beating in the distance, ordering the troops. The thrum of them beating his blood, in his bone. Seemingly unrelated at the onset, but no less tramatic, a double murder mystery engulfs Major Grey's circumstance in his current post.

    There was a lot of pieces spinning here, The drums were beating in the distance, ordering the troops. There was a lot of pieces spinning here, including wisps of "possibilities" toward John's true self, that I thought were brought together brilliantly. Within all the revelations I found LJG's sharp intelligence and curiosity, ingrained sense of duty and logic, deep-seated protectiveness of those under his charge, and his keen insights of himself and his social consciousness further develops, bringing new insights into an already noble, human character.

    So far, this novella is my fav LJG to date. Mar 18, Carol Oliveira rated it really liked it. I love lord John. I hope he finds happiness, like he had with Hector when he was young, by the end of the Outlander books. Lord John and the Hellfire Club 0. Some of them a little too eager. He finds himself in the middle of a murder mystery and conspiracy. This one is pretty quick and to the point, with only a couple of chapters, but Gabaldon knows how to pack a lot of detail and info into a Lord John and the Hellfire Club 0.

    This one is pretty quick and to the point, with only a couple of chapters, but Gabaldon knows how to pack a lot of detail and info into a tiny space. She never comes right out and says why John was exiled to Ardsmuir, but you get enough nuggets to piece it together here. Lord John and the Succubus 1. John's on campaign in Germany and there are rumors running amok about a succubus. John has to get to the bottom of it, while dodging advances from foreign princesses and trying to figure out just what Capt.

    Stephan von Namtzen is about. Lord John and the Haunted Soldier 2. As he goes poking around to find out exactly what the military and the war office are trying so desperately to cover up, we meet one of John's half-brothers and find out that John's injuries are far more serious than previously thought.