Guide After Laughing Comes Crying (Sicilian Studies Book 17)

Free download. Book file PDF easily for everyone and every device. You can download and read online After Laughing Comes Crying (Sicilian Studies Book 17) file PDF Book only if you are registered here. And also you can download or read online all Book PDF file that related with After Laughing Comes Crying (Sicilian Studies Book 17) book. Happy reading After Laughing Comes Crying (Sicilian Studies Book 17) Bookeveryone. Download file Free Book PDF After Laughing Comes Crying (Sicilian Studies Book 17) at Complete PDF Library. This Book have some digital formats such us :paperbook, ebook, kindle, epub, fb2 and another formats. Here is The CompletePDF Book Library. It's free to register here to get Book file PDF After Laughing Comes Crying (Sicilian Studies Book 17) Pocket Guide.
Touchstones
Contents:


  1. Thayer's Notes:
  2. 21 Best Medieval History images in | Medieval, Middle Ages, My books
  3. After Laughing Comes Crying: Sicilian Immigrants on Louisiana Plantations by Joseph L Cacibauda
  4. Latest Articles

Nothing about the encounter seemed promising. Our campus was a tiny outpost in a tiny town, and Steves delivered his talk not in some grand lecture hall but in a drab room in the basement of the student union. I was poor, shy, anxious, sheltered, repressed and extremely pale. I was a particular kind of Pacific Northwest white guy — blind to myself and my place in the world. I had never really traveled; I was more comfortable on Greyhound buses than on airplanes. Going to Europe seemed like something aristocrats did, like fox hunting or debutante balls.

My girlfriend dragged me to the talk. I had never even heard of Steves. But what he said over the next hour or so changed the rest of my life. He paces, gesticulates and speaks very fast. He tells his favorite old jokes as if they were eternally new. Onstage, he is a combination of preacher, comedian, salesman, life-hacker, professor and inspirational speaker.

Steves told us, that day, how to pack our entire lives into a single bag measuring 9 by 22 by 14 inches. The back door, by contrast, led to revelations. He showed us impossibly enticing photos: cobblestone piazzas teeming with fruit stalls, quirky wooden hotels among wildflowers in the Alps, vast arsenals of multicolored cheese.

Thayer's Notes:

He made travel seem less like a luxury than a necessary exploration of the self, a civic responsibility, a basic courtesy to your fellow humans. It seemed almost unreasonable not to go. Above all, Steves told us, do not be afraid. The people of the world are wonderful, and the planet we share is spectacular. But the only way to really understand that is to go and see it for yourself. So go. My girlfriend and I left the room converts to the gospel of Rick Steves.

We bought his book and highlighted it to near-meaninglessness. We started mapping itineraries, squirreling away money, asking relatives for donations. In probably the worst phone call of my life, my rancher grandfather expressed shock and dismay that I would ask him to support this meaningless overseas lark.

When You Laugh So Hard You Cry...

Eventually, over many months, we scraped together just enough to buy plane tickets and order minimalist Steves-approved supplies, including a travel towel so thin and nonabsorbent that it seemed to just push the moisture around your skin until you forgot you were wet. We packed exactly as Steves taught us: T-shirts rolled into space-saving noodles, just enough clothes to get us from one hotel laundry session to the next.

Then, for the first time in our lives, we left North America. When I opened it recently, the reality of that long-ago trip hissed out with fresh urgency. My year-old self recorded everything. On our first day in Europe, we bought imported Austrian apples with fat, heavy English coins and saw a woman stumble on a staircase, breaking an entire bag of newly bought china. We arrived at our first hostel, the Y. As we tried to make out the names of the dead, songbirds sang strenuously in the trees all around us.

This juxtaposition — old death, new life — blew my jet-lagged American mind. Reality fills its gaps. That, more or less, was the theme of the trip. For six weeks, we followed the Steves game plan. We shared squalid bunks with other young travelers from Denmark, Australia, Canada and Japan. In the stately public parks of Paris, we ate rotisserie chickens with our bare hands. One stifling afternoon at the Colosseum in Rome, we watched a worker slam his ladder against the edge of an arch and break off some ancient bricks.

He looked over at us, looked down at the bricks, kicked dirt over them and kept working. Once, I left my underwear on a Mediterranean beach overnight and, since I could not afford to lose a pair, had to go back and pick it up the next day, in full view of all the sunbathers. Wherever we went, Rick Steves was with us. We seemed to have entered the world of his slides: the fruit markets and overnight trains, the sunny French river under the ancient Roman aqueduct. Sometimes our European hosts, with the quiet pride of someone who once met Elvis, told us stories about Steves.

He was a gentleman, they said, a truly good man, and he always came in person to check out their hotels, and he never failed to ask them how their children were doing. By the end of our trip, we were completely broke. We flew home looking ragged, shaggy, weather-beaten and exhausted. But of course Steves was right: Our lives were never the same. We were still young Americans, but we felt liberated and empowered, like true citizens of the world. The most important things we learned all had to do with home.

As the English writer G. I began to realize how silly and narrow our notion of exceptionalism is — this impulse to consider ourselves somehow immune to the forces that shape the rest of the world. The environment I grew up in, with its malls and freeways, its fantasies of heroic individualism, began to seem unnatural. I started to sense how much reality exists elsewhere in the world — not just in a theoretical sense, in books and movies, but with the full urgent weight of the real. And not just in Europe but on every other continent, all the time, forever.

I began to realize how much I still had to learn before I could pretend to understand anything. Some people get there themselves, or their communities help them. But I needed him, and I am eternally glad I was dragged that day to see him talk. Steves answered his front door slightly distracted.

I had come in the middle of his breakfast preparations. He was stirring a block of frozen orange juice into a pitcher of water. This was April , exactly 20 years after my first trip to Europe. I had come to see Steves in the most exotic place possible: his home. He lives just north of Seattle, in a town so rainy it has a free umbrella-share program.

There is nothing particularly exotic about the house itself. It has beige carpeting, professionally trimmed shrubs and a back deck with a hot tub. What was exotic was simply that Steves was there. He had just returned from his frenetic speaking tour of the United States and would be leaving almost immediately on his annual trip to Europe. For now, he was making breakfast: frozen blueberries, Kashi cereal, O. But of course, he could not. Steves is gone too much, yo-yoing between the misty forests of the Pacific Northwest and the sun-baked cathedrals of Europe. Every year, no matter what else is going on, Steves spends at least four months practicing the kind of travel he has preached for odd years: hauling his backpack up narrow staircases in cheap hotels, washing his clothes in sinks, improvising picnics.

He is now 63, and he could afford to retire many times over. Among his colleagues, Steves is a notorious workaholic. On long car rides, he sits in the back seat and types op-eds on his laptop. His relentless hands-on control of every aspect of his business is what has distinguished the Rick Steves brand. It is also, obviously, exhausting — if not for Steves, then at least for the people around him. He has two children, now grown, and for much of their childhoods, Steves was gone. He was building his company, changing the world. For very long stretches, his wife was forced to be a single mother.

She and Steves divorced in after 25 years of marriage. Every summer, when the family joined Steves in Europe, his pace hardly slackened: They would cover major cities in 48 hours, blitzing through huge museums back to back. The kids complained so much, on one trip, that Steves finally snapped — if they were so miserable, he said, they could just go sit in the hotel room all day and play video games.

They remember this day as heaven. One year, while Steves was away, the children converted to Catholicism. His son, Andy Steves, eventually went into the family business: He now works as a tour guide and even published a European guidebook. Steves is fully aware that his obsessive work ethic is unusual. He admits that he has regrets. But he cannot make himself stop. He has the fervor of the true evangelist: The more people he meets, the more cities he visits, the more lives he might change. At one point, as we talked, he pulled out the itinerary for his coming trip — from Sicily to Iceland, with no down time whatsoever.

Just looking at it made him giddy. What would I do if I stayed home? Not much. Nothing I would remember. In his house, Steves offered up a little show and tell. He pointed out an antique silver cigarette lighter shaped like the Space Needle. He sat down at his baby grand piano and lost himself, for a few happy minutes, playing Scarlatti. He took me to a room filled with books and reached up to a very high shelf. When Steves was 13, he decided, for no apparent reason, to conduct a deep statistical analysis of the Billboard pop charts. The lines were multicolored and interwoven — it looked like the subway map of some fantastical foreign city.

You could see, at a glance, the rising and falling fortunes of the Beatles red and Creedence Clearwater Revival black and Elvis Presley dots and dashes. Steves kept this up for three years, taping together many pieces of graph paper, and in the end he summarized the data in an authoritative-looking table that he typed on the family typewriter. This is what was in that binder: a systematic breakdown of the most successful bands from to , as determined by the objective statistics of an analytical adolescent weirdo.

Steves laughed. It was ridiculous. But it was also a perfect window into his mind. Even at 13, a powerful energy was coiled inside him — an unusual combination of obsession and precision, just waiting for some worthwhile project to burst out in. And that, coincidentally, was exactly when he found it: the project of his life. In the summer of , when Steves was 14, his parents took him to Europe. They owned a business tuning and importing pianos, and they wanted to see factories firsthand.

Steves approached this first trip abroad with the same meticulous energy he brought to his Billboard graphs. As he traveled around the continent, he recorded the essential data of his journey on the backs of postcards: locations, activities, weather, expenses. One day, Steves spent 40 cents on fishing gear.

Another, he met a year-old man who had witnessed the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand. To keep everything in order, Steves numbered the postcards sequentially. He still has them all packed lovingly into an old wooden box. On that same formative trip, the Steves family visited relatives in Norway. They happened to be there in July , when Neil Armstrong walked on the moon.

Europe was a crash course in cultural relativity. In a park in Oslo, he had an epiphany: The foreign humans around him, he realized, were leading existences every bit as rich and full as his own. That first trip set the course for everything that followed. When Steves was 18, he went back to Europe without his parents.

Soon, life in America became a series of interludes between travel. He taught piano to earn money, then stretched that money as far as he possibly could, sleeping on church pews and park benches, in empty barns and construction zones, from Western Europe to Afghanistan. He turned his cheapness into a science. Instead of paying for a hotel room in a city, Steves would use his Railpass and sleep on a train for the night — four hours out, four hours back.

He would stuff himself on free breakfast bread, then try to eat as little as possible for the rest of the day. Naturally, he recorded all this, and today he has an impressive archive of old travel journals. Their pages preserve, in tiny handwriting, shadowy young dissidents in Moscow, diarrhea in Bulgaria, revolution in Nicaragua.

21 Best Medieval History images in | Medieval, Middle Ages, My books

In his 20s, Steves brought his wide-roaming wisdom back to the United States. He started to supplement his piano teaching with travel seminars. His signature class, European Travel Cheap, ran for six hours. Steves could have talked longer than that, but it struck him as impractical for his students. In Europe, he rented a nine-seat minibus and started to lead small tours. Eventually, his seminars and tour notes morphed into his books. It had no ISBN and looked so amateurish that bookstores assumed it was an early review copy.

This was the birth of the Rick Steves empire. Rick Steves both is and is not his TV persona. Offscreen, he allows himself to be much more explicitly political. He has the passion of the autodidact. Growing up, Steves led a relatively sheltered existence: He was a white, comfortable, middle-class baby boomer in a white, comfortable, middle-class pocket of America. Travel did for him what he promises it will do for everyone else: It put him in contact with other realities.

He saw desperate poverty in Iran and became obsessed with economic injustice. He studied the war industry and colonial exploitation. In the early days, Steves injected political lessons into his European tours. Sometimes he would arrive in a city with no hotel reservations, just to make his privileged customers feel the anxiety of homelessness. In Munich, he would set up camp in an infamous hippie circus tent, among all the countercultural wanderers of Europe. Today, Steves is more strategic. His most powerful tool, he realizes, is his broad appeal. He has an uncanny knack for making serious criticism feel gentle and friendly.

But other nations have some pretty good ideas too. Steves learned this strategy, he said, from his early days running tours, living with the same people for weeks at a time. Survival required being pleasant. Instead, he pointed out different perspectives with a smile. He became fluent in the needs of American tourists.

I want to preach to organizations that need to hear this, so I need to compromise a little bit so the gatekeepers let it through to their world. This balancing act has become increasingly difficult over the past two decades, in a world of terrorism, war, nationalism and metastasizing partisanship. After the Sept. They canceled tours and cut back budgets. Steves, however, remained defiantly optimistic.

He promised his staff that there would be no cuts, no layoffs and no shift in message. He insisted that a world in crisis needed travel more, not less. Soon the shock of Sept. In his hometown, Steves caused a controversy when he walked around removing rows of American flags that had been set up in support of the war. It was, he argued, an act of patriotism: The flag is meant to represent all Americans, not just war supporters. Lately, Steves concedes, his political message has begun to take over his teaching. Some moments in the book verge on un-American. Occasionally, despite his best efforts, Steves still ruffles feathers.

After one recent speech in the Deep South, event organizers refused to pay Steves — their conservative sponsors, he learned, considered his message a form of liberal propaganda. In recent years, Steves has become a happy warrior for an unlikely cause: the legalization of marijuana. He first tried the drug in Afghanistan, in the s, in the name of cultural immersion, and he was fascinated by its effect on his mind.

In his headquarters you will find a poster of the Mona Lisa holding a gargantuan spliff. On a shelf in his living room, right there among all the European knickknacks, Steves displays a sizable bong.

After Laughing Comes Crying: Sicilian Immigrants on Louisiana Plantations by Joseph L Cacibauda

Sometimes, fans urge Steves to run for office. To stay in a family-owned hotel in Bulgaria is to strengthen global democracy; to pack light is to break the iron logic of consumerism; to ride a train across Europe is to challenge the fossil-fuel industry. Travel, to Steves, is not some frivolous luxury — it is an engine for improving humankind, for connecting people and removing their prejudices, for knocking distant cultures together to make unlikely sparks of joy and insight.

When people tell Steves to stay out of politics, to stick to travel, he can only laugh. When I want to do something, I can do it. Steves is deeply indifferent to creature comforts. When I visited him, the back seat of his car was covered with a greenish slime, practically disintegrating, because of a mysterious leak. He just cracked the windows to try to dry it out. Steves prefers to spend his money on his favorite causes. His activism can be quirky and impulsive. This, pointedly, was how much money he would get back from President George W.

Last year, during a chat with one of the national leaders of the Lutheran Church, Steves wondered how much it would cost to send every single Lutheran congregation in the United States a DVD of his recent TV special about Martin Luther. In the s, working in partnership with the Y. The plan was to take that money out of the banking system and let it do a few decades of social good, at which point Steves could sell the buildings to fund his retirement.

Eventually he worked his way up to buying a whole unit apartment complex — and then he donated it outright to the Y. The mothers, he said, needed it more than he would. Steves is obsessed with the problem of poverty and amazed at our perpetual misunderstanding of it. This needs to be talked about. I can do it, and I can get away with it. I could retire now. Once the travel market finally recovered, some years after Sept.

By taking a principled stand, Steves flourished. Today, his chipper voice is reaching more Americans than ever. One night, in his living room, Steves pulled out a plain black notebook. This, however, was something else entirely — a record of a very different kind of journey.

For the next 20 minutes, Steves would read me koans about the glories of being stoned. He would get baked, open up to somewhere in the middle and jot down whatever he happened to be thinking — deep or shallow, silly or angry. There is no chronology; on every page, axioms from many different decades commingle. The entries covered an impressively wide territory. I found myself wondering, for the thousandth time: Who does this?

What kind of mind not only thinks of such a project but actually follows through with it, decade after decade after decade? As Steves read, he interrupted himself again and again with great shouting honks of laughter, and I cackled right along with him. Then, suddenly, with almost no transition, we would find ourselves deep in earnest conversation about the nature of true happiness or the dangers of ambition.

And then we would suddenly be cackling again. And of course there were many, many more descriptions of getting high itself. At some point, he looked up from the journal. Because this is me. He shook his head. An earlier version of this article misstated the size of a bus Steves used in his early tours through Europe. It was a nine-seat minibus, not a nine-foot minibus. When my wife and I were married, my mother-in-law told us she had a special gift for us. In Sweden, on an island, in the forest.

As with all magical places, getting to the island in Sweden requires some effort particularly as my wife, son and I live in Los Angeles. After the plane, the train and a car ride to the countryside, a boat ferries us across the lake from the mainland. There are only a handful of cottages — with no electricity or running water — on the island. Distances walking in the forest are hard to determine. You spend so much time walking over, under and around branches, brush and fallen trees that a simple hike can quickly become a disorienting journey.

There are no straight lines in a forest. In Sweden, mushrooms are like gold. Specifically chanterelle mushrooms. Aside from their high cost and their subtle earthy flavor cooked in butter and served on toast , their value is enhanced by how late in the season they grow. So Swedes are extremely protective of their chanterelle patches. The day my mother-in-law took us for our first walk, everything seemed slow and quiet besides the buzz of the mosquitoes. I listened to her tell stories of playing here as a child; exploring it made me feel young, and nostalgic for a past I had never lived.

I marched behind my wife and was careful when stepping over fallen trees or catching branches she bent back to allow me to pass. Some mushrooms you can eat, and some can make you very sick. Animals know this, and people who spend lots of time in the forest know this. My mother-in-law knows. She took us to a clearing among some trees, looked around a bit, then stopped and bent down.

She said she had given each of her children a patch in the forest where she found that mushrooms consistently grew each year. The whale sighting happened right away, minutes into Day 1. Jon, Dave and I had just been dropped off on a remote Alaskan shoreline, an hour and a half by boat from the closest speck of a town. Jon was working as a sea-kayaking guide that summer in Glacier Bay National Park, and he had invited us up for a seven-day excursion during his week off. As the boat that delivered us vanished, the drone of its engine dampening into a murmur and then finally trailing off, it became unthinkably quiet on the beach, and the largeness and strangeness of our surroundings were suddenly apparent.

It was a familiar phenomenon for Jon from the start of all his trips: a moment that people instinctually paused to soak in. We were on earth — finally, really on earth. We were only starting to move around again, packing our gear into the kayaks, when we heard the first huff of a blowhole, not far offshore. Jon was ecstatic. It seemed to him as if the animal were putting on a show, swimming playfully in the kelp, diving, resurfacing, then plowing its open mouth across the surface to feed. He took it as a good omen. Though I had no idea at the time, he was anxious that Dave and I might feel intimidated about making the trip; such a big payoff, so quickly, would get us excited and defuse any apprehensions.

For Dave, the whale-sighting had exactly the opposite effect. Once, when he was a kid, his dad took him scuba diving with dolphins. They were friendly, awe-inspiring creatures, purportedly, but they terrified Dave instead. He could still conjure the feeling of hanging defenselessly in that water while the animals deftly swirled around him, less like solid objects than flashes of reflected light, while he could move only in comparative slow-motion. I keep thinking that he begged the councel to send him back as a person so they could have a life together.

BUT I have a very active imagination, so I don't know if that was in there or if I just dreamed it up myself when the book was done with. Thanks :D. The Secret Life of Bryan was one of my faves of the visitation series. I'll have to check out fantasy, it sounds good. Ireland, it will be interesting to see if they got the right book. CrazyDaisyLou - It kind of sounds like a short story I read in Man of My Dreams which was an anthology except the ending it much, much different. In this short story the heroine is a librarian who discovers her former lover at a solstace celebration.

He left her because he had been taken by the fairies and was the consort of the fairy queen. It's probably not the same one but I thought I'd mention it. It does sound like a very good story, hope you figure out what it is. There is a Johanna Lindsey with a plot like this. The heroine is named Rosalind or something like that and is a medieval history professor. She collects swords and bought one that was cursed and brought forth Thor, a Viking warrior. They fall in love and travel through time, and the only way to break the curse is if she voluntarily gives him the sword back, which she does to free him, but it send them back to their respective times.

Her brother and best friend both tell her she's been sick and it's been a dream or some such thing and at the end Thor does appear in her time as a modern man, having appealed to Odin in Valhalla to give him a second chance at life. I think it was called Until Forever or something like that. Her name is Roseleen, but other than that you are on the mark gracer. It is called Until Forever. I don't usually read contemporaries, but I remember reading one when I was younger that I would like to find again. It was written in the 80s and followed the romantic lives of music prodigies who meet at school as teenagers.

It followed them into adulthood and was an old school 80s epic. The main character is a virtuoso girl who is considerably younger than the others who has a serious case of unrequited love for the big man on campus. He de-flowers her an expression one never uses outside of a romance novel and then walks out on her. They wind up getting together years later and she of course has only ever had sex once with him as a teenager because who knows.

They also have a male friend who is involved in some weird bi-threesome plot where he refers to some sex act as being as romantic as "changing a light bulb. Thanks so much Gracer and LucyMaude. I hope this is it, it sounds like it is. I'm surprised I don't have it, considering I've collected 25 Johanna Lindsey novels so far.

But I'm 25, and it's been at least 9 years since I read it, and I didn't even actually own any books back then. I am SO going out tomorrow to look for it. Remember Me there are 3 of them.

Site Navigation

I am still looking for the book in message Here is the description from bn. Synopsis Eyes snapping emerald fire, Isabeau DeBurgh alias the Devil's Flame-sat motionless upon her fine black stallion. The most feared and notorious highwayman of them all was about to strike Publishers Weekly Readers who don't put a premium on originality may find this fast-paced tale of s England amusing, with its masterful hero and spunky heroine.

Isabeau DeBurgh, a beautiful woman with a hot temper and a vocabulary to match, earns a living at what she does best--highway robbery. But the night she tries to rob Lord Griffin Stone, an aristocratic black sheep just back from America, her luck runs out; he wounds her in a sword fight. Griffin won't turn Isabeau over to the authorities who might hang her nor turn her loose to steal, so he decides to take her home, dress her up and teach her the finer points of etiquette.

Meanwhile Isabeau develops a soft spot in her heart for Griffin, as he does for her. And why not? Compared to the rest of the crew, a mere thief looks pretty attractive. Winniekuhl, I think I have solved the mystery of I knew it sounded familiar, I just had a hard time coming up with the name. It is Birdie by Taylor Ryan. It is a Harlequin Historical published in Actually, a copy is being sold on ebay right now if you want to look at it.

I probably shouldn't be so confident. After all I could be wrong. But I hope I'm not. Let me know if I got it. Thanks megkrahl, I read the desciption and it is not it. Thanks for trying! Hi Winnie, i thought it might be The Rogue and the Hellion by Connie Mason as she is a highwayman, but found out to be a girl, he takes her back to teach her a lesson but she turns out to be a lady!

But then i realised it wasn't published until , might have been re-released, but i thought it was worth a mention just incase Hope you find what yr looking for! Her flirtatious sister, Daphne, is engaged to a man who will only inherit if he is married by a certain date. Daphne elopes, leaving behind a note and her wedding dress.

Sophie shows up at the altar, but Alex, the bridegroom, recognizes her for who she is. They agree to marry to allow him to inherit and her to save face for her sister. It does sound familiar, but I am at a loss as well. The names of the sisters are different, but the plot sounds very similar. In the Bradley story, the sisters are twins.

Could be it. I found a description: Lovely Sophia Forest was a very intellectual young lady for the year in Regency England--quite different from her beautiful and flighty sister, Daphne. All London was agog when Sophia rather than Daphne wed the dashing Earl of Gresham, whose scorn for bookish females was well-known. The marriage was intended as a business arrangement only--to preserve the Earl's fortune and give Sophia financial independence.

But what was Sophia to do when she found herself enamoured of her husband, though too proud to admit it? Sophia needed all her wit and womanly wiles in a game of pretense and passion, to make the man she loved, love her. We'll see if it's the right one. It's original copyright date was Hello, I was wondering if anyone could help me find the names of two books I read some years ago. I believe they were published around always before August I believe they are from British authors.

They are both romances. One has a yellow cover with little cakes or cupcakes - I don't recall on them. She shares her house with some friends. The book is really funny. The other one has a light blue cover and I don't remember the story that well. I do know that in the end, the guy gives the girl a unique rose that he himself well, his company I guess created by matching 2 types of roses. In this last one, I just remembered that in the beginning, the girl is trying some clothes in a shop and afraid of a bee runs topless through the shop and bumps into the guy.

Well, I know it's not much, but if anyone could help, I'd be very grateful. Thank you very much. I love that you guys have this section. New here, so please bear with me. I also think she had a girlfriend who runs a local bookshop. I know it isn't much to go on, but every time I think I may be remembering more of the story I start to think I'm combining two stories into one. It's driving me batty. Nyah99 -- yellow cover with possible cupcakes reminds me of He Loves Lucy by Susan Donovan , but I'm not sure that's your book.

This one takes place in Miami? The heroine has a goal to lose weight for publicity with the hero being her trainer. Not one of the Bridgertons I'll dig around a bit and see if I can come up with a title. Thank you so much both of you. Thank you again. Thank you for your help. I've just found the name of the other book. First of all, its cover is not blue, but white.

Aviddiva- Thanks. It could be Amanda Quick, though I still can't seem to place it. And it seems like she has several with trading places type themes. I'll keep digging thru her stuff and see, though I appreciate you still looking as well. The Duke's grandfather corresponds with the heroine and carries on the courtship. Grandpa dies and when grandson comes back from the war, he finds out he is engaged to her. Grandson goes to confront her, she thinks he is the new footman she has hired and the story then continues.

It's pretty funny actually. Hope this helps. In that book, the hero is disguised as the heroine's butler. He is a spy and the powers that be believe that her deceased husband had something of importance he was a spy too. There is also a Julia Quinn where the hero shows up and pretends to be her estate manager or something similar. She's the impoverished daughter of an earl or something similar who is working as a paid companion to a crotchety old lady who's nephew is a Marquis posing as her estate manager to get to the bottom of who is blackmailing her.

Very funny and entertaining! Thanks guys. Oddly, I have missed all of those and will now be reading those to see if maybe I've just lost my entire peas sized brain and maybe DID actually read one of those. Hopefully it'll come to me soon as it's still tickling the back of my mind constantly. Very sad I tell you. Thanks again!

I'm pretty sure its a historical romance but all i remember is that the hero if the book is sold at an auction. He is bought by a woman for her daughter. I don't remember the name or the author of the book. I have a vague memory of one like that as well, but can't quite place it. I need some help with a book title too, It's a historical romance and the lady poses as a highwayman to take cre of the estate. The lady also posed as an ugly crone on the night their supposed meeting.

Not quite sure this fits the bill but My Lady Notorius by Jo Beverley has a highwayman heroine with a cruel father and brother. She is trying to protect her widowed sister and baby who the father is trying to marry off to some awful man. The book is part of the Malloren series and takes place in Georgian England.

The one you describe sounds familiar too but so far it's escaping me! Hi everyone! Here goes nothing I'm looking for a book that's been bugging me for about a month now. I don't know the title or author or character names. I think the "hero" is from a well-known, well-off family. I know the "heroine" is from a poor family. She has red hair. I'm not sure if she has an older brother or dad.

I remember the first chapter or so clearly, but not sure if the rest when they're older is correct or from another story. I think the two sisters were off to the store I think the sister was hitting on the guy Sadly, that's all I remember. I keep thinking Linda Howard, but I just don't know Thank-you for any help you guys can give. I will try my best to do the same. Thank you again! It is! Thank-you so much! I cannot believe how I could have overlooked that! I had a feeling it might've been Linda Howard Thank-you again! Hi Suge, I tried to read all the threads and it doesn't look as if anyone had named your book, but I have the answer!

It was one of the first romance novels I ever owned and one I go back to and reread every now and then!


  • Italian Grammar You Really Need to Know: Teach Yourself (Teach Yourself Language Reference).
  • Sicily Archives - My Sicilian Family Tree.
  • The Editor's Notes:.
  • Touchstones.

Hi, all--I'm trying to find a certain book. It was out in paperback before probably well before that. The setting is definitely 19th century or earlier nobility, etc. I remember two main things about it: earlier on, there's a scene where the heroine is in the library with the hero moonlight, filmy nightgown, lots of sexual tension ; later, he kidnaps her and they're in an inn--very steamy sex then. If any of you can help, it would be much appreciated!

Isisreads, if you reverse the order of the scenes with the library later than the inn , there are two scenes very similar to what you've described in Judith Ivory 's Untie My Heart. It's my least favourite Ivory book but lots of other people absolutely love it. Of course, an inn and a library are kind of popular settings for historical romance, so any other details you can supply might help readers here pinpoint the book you're looking for.

I'm looking for a book I read around 5 or 6 years ago so let's say for starters that I picked up at a book sale at the local library. So it had probably been around for a while before that. The setting of the novel is I believe in a sort of system similar to 19th or 18th century England where there were still nobles around that controlled estates and whatnot. Additionally, fine carriages and at least unsophisticated firearms were around too if I remember correctly. The plot revolves around a heroine named Kate or something similar - I want to say her full name was Kathleen or Katherine or something along those lines who has gotten stuck with running the family estate because her brother, who should be in charge, is incompetent and doesn't really do anything.

At the same time she's riding around in dark clothes on a black horse, holding up stagecoaches for some odd reason. It had to do with the family honor - I want to say she was looking to catch smugglers or something along those lines? Don't remember too well. But she's holding up these coaches looking for something. Now a gentleman from somewhere else visits the estate for a bit for some reason or another and love begins to spark between him and Kate don't remember his name, sorry.

He begins to deduce that she's the highwayman in question and follows her one night when she makes a run. Things go wrong on this trip and she gets shot by a guy in the carriage but the gentleman saves her and brings her back to her home. He then covers for her in order to make sure no one else found out about her double life. Near the end of the story Kate finds that some of her brother's friends one creepy guy in particular who keeps on hitting on her are performing some criminal activity on the family land.

She gets captured and the gentleman goes to save her, killing the ringleader in a duel. So yeah sorry there aren't too many specific details but that's what I remember from the book. Hope someone can help me find it - even a couple of general titles that might fit the profile would help! Gasharko, I don't know the name of the book you seek although it sounds tantalizingly familiar but this list of "highwayman" themed regencies, which includes stories with women in male bandit disguise, might help you find what you're looking for: Highwaymen themed romances at The Nonesuch.

Hello from Australia — I am searching for a book — unknown title or author The other central character is the dashing pirate who attempts to seduce and control her. Cheers from Aus, Tan. I need some help to name a book. I know the book was a Harlequin Presents I want to say around or later about a married guy who was dating another younger woman. She stops the affair and he tries to convince her not to.

He worked for father-in-law. The man's wife was a paralytic, and at the end of the book, she leaves the husband for her nurse? If anybody could remember the title, I would appreciate. It has been bothering me about remembering the title. Hi Guys, I am new to this group, and I was hoping to get some help finding a book i read around It is basically about a temporary housekeeper or a helper who is 8 months pregnant, and you later find out that she is a virgin.

The owner of the house who is a businessman, ends up falling in love with her. I think in the scene that she tells the hero that she is a virgin is where she is getting made fun off by local boys, as she is young and seen as easy because she winds up pregnant.

She is actually a surrogate for her sister and her husband, but both die in an accident leaving her alone. To take care of herself and the child, she gets this temp job. I believe she is Italian. He also helps her give birth to the child in his house, which i think is a girl. The last scene is of them getting married, and she is walking down the aisle, looking at the baby and thinking about everything. I have been trying to recall this book for a long time but as it is one of the first ones I read, I don't remember more about it.

I have looked through many book lists and themed lists to find it including all romance writers, romancewiki, and fictiondb. I would really appreciate any help i get. I think the heroine has never been rich, and I am positive the setting is in the U. But thanks anyways. Let me know if any others come to your mind. Maybe this one?

Myles Wellington still grieved over the loss of his young wife, but when he learned that her sister, Faith, was carrying his child, he felt the stirrings of life inside he'd believed he'd never feel again! Faith had secretly agreed to help her sister give her husband this last gift, but she had her own reasons for wanting this child, wanting to give Myles something no one else could.

She'd loved him for so long, had been so alone - until Myles insisted she live with him How could she share the same house with the man whose touch set her soul on fire, yet how could she resist grabbing at the chance fate had given her to have the only man she'd ever loved?. Myles wanted this child, but he was shocked to discover he wanted Faith even more. Exulting in the intense desires she aroused in him to protect, to possess, Myles struggled to break free of the past. Could they put to rest their memories of the woman they'd both loved and build a future together?

Sounds like the kind of plots they have. It could be presents, romance, or american romance. I just came across a special edition silhouette called An abundance of babies by Marie Ferrarella but it isnt the one, which is very similar! I am almost starting to feel like the book doesnt exist. Any of you feel that way while looking for a book? I was searching through vintageromances. You said you read the book in the early 's so I've only been looking for books in that time frame, but could it also have been published in the 's? Also, is there anything you remember about the cover, such as color maybe?

It is possible it was published in the late 90s.

Latest Articles

I was thinking the cover had yellow and blue on it Pregnant female butler 8-months along. The book summary doesn't mention surrogacy, but the term did show up two times when I searched for that term in Google Books. XD The heroine is a surrogate for her aunt and uncle though. This is it!!! Yea I had a feeling the summary wouldn't mention surrogacy, but I was wrong about the sister and husband.

Thank you so much! Once i saw the cover, I realized I have seen it before. Let me know if you need help finding a book, I'll be sure to return the favour. Hi guys i'am so glad to have found this place I have been looking for this Victorian romance about the hero being engaged since he was young by his father. He falls in love with his newfound bride and so does she. But she tries to be more of a lady and so his best friend teaches her how to act in society while our hero is on a trip The sister in law is in a wheel chair and is trying to get rid of the heroine and also there are snipets of their past lives Sorry if it sounds confusing but I' ve been looking for this book forever!

My name is Florecer and I am a new member of this group. First let me answer the question of Nyah99, the post number 84 about the last novel: the description sounds like "The Shocking Lord Standon" by Louise Allen, and is part of the Revenhurst Saga. Here a leave the book description. He cannot honorably deny them, but he won't be forced into marriage.

Encountering a respectable governess in scandalizing circumstances, Gareth demands her help—to make him entirely ineligible. He educates the buttoned-up Miss Jessica Gifford in the courtesan's arts. But Gareth hasn't bargained on such an ardent, clever pupil—or on his passionate response to her! He wanted to cause a stir—it seems they are about to brew a scandal!

The list the list in the correct order is: 1. Ravenhurst 6. Hurst 7. Now is my turn to have a question. I am looking for a book whose name and author I can not remember. The plot was somthing like this: two sisters twins are abducted by a bandit. This man promises to free one of the sisters if the other promises to stay with him.

One of them grants the motion and gradually discovers that the villain has a noble heart. I read the description when I was looking for other books to read, but never wrote down the data of this book to read next. If any of you could tell me the name of the book or author, I am very grateful for your help. Okay, I read this book several years ago, and can't remember what the title or author is. Its a Regency romance. The main female lives in the slums of England. I don't really remember who the hero was, he was an earl or something i think, and he takes her in and makes her over.

But near the end of the book I think they have a fight and she returns to the slums just as a cholera outbreak hits. She has a prostitute friend who dies and because she then catches cholera as well, she loses the baby she was pregnant with. I don't know the book and really want to read it again. She is English but she grew up in the Paris slums.

The Earl seeks her out for revenge complicated plot and then agrees to marry her back in England. They have a short lived blissful time but then have a big disagreement she learns the truth about him and she goes back to Paris and the slums. There is a cholera epidemic there after she leaves him in England. I think she did lose a baby, but I can't remember for sure. It was a really good book. He has a scarred face and this is the last of a trilogy of brothers.

Is this it? Woohoo, a success story! Yay for a happy ending! I never know these, which is weird because I've read so many romances. Hi,I m looking for a harlequin I read many many years ago. The heroine is english and visits her cousin who lives in a farm in France i think with her husband. The heroine also helps out in the farm. Her cousin tries to ruin everything she does around the farm -remember an incident where the heroine cooks soup for the farm workers and the cousin drops soap in it on purpose to ruin it. The farm owner who is her cousin's brother in law is very prejudiced against her.

I want to read it again! Can't believe it really! I ve been looking for this book for so long and you just found it right away! I ve got another one but I am afraid that's much harder to find since I remember so little of it It's all thanks to the person who runs the Vintage Romances website. She breaks each book down by keywords and I use that to help me look for your book. I'm afraid the other book you are looking for is much harder since there isn't a lot of information to set it apart from any other medical romance, but I will try. Hi everyone I was wondering if you can help me figure out the title of this book I read a little over a year ago It has to do with a wealthy girl who runs away from home to find herself in the streets.

She becomes friends with a group or a "gang" of pickpockets. I distinctly remember that most of them were good kids expect for one of them who I believe was named Jack? I'm not quite so sure. There was also a character which was a small boy who grew fond of this girl. She would read to them every night. She also fell in love with the leader of the "gang". The mean boy Jack tried to force himself on her and was shunned from the group. Jack teams up with an evil man who is the leader of a rival pickpocket gang and they try to take them out.

By this time the girls older brother finds her and takes her back to her rich lifestyle. Can anyone help me? Theres also a sequel to that book. It is set later when the girl is a young lady and she meets again with the kid she fell in love with and they have an affair and blah blah you know the rest haha. Also there's a book really similar to If You Deceive by Kresley Cole same time period I believe except: -Theres a poor girl who works at a bar and she meets this handsome lord.

Anyways something happens that she goes back to where she lived neighborhood and gets herself really sick. The lord comes to find her and her prostitute friend tells him that she died and was in this building where they keep the bodies. He finds her on the table and she was bleeding she had lost the babe and she recuperates and they live happily ever after I also believe he was extremely rich and he left his rather luxurious home to live downtown paris or another setting because something happened In any case, that's what I've been looking into.

Most of them seem to be doctor-nurse romances, but I couldn't find a nurse-patient book that fits your description. It's harder with older books because sometimes there isn't a description available, the description is short, or the description is vague. Would you like to do search on your own? Starlight genie - thank you so much for your help, I will try this website you mentioned! I was wondering if you could help me figure out what book this is it has be bugging me for ever not being able to figure it out! I remember very little about the book.

I can't remember the title, author or even the character's names since its been a while since I read it The children aren't her own. The kids were given up by their parents, because they were poor. Everyone is under the impression that the husband is kind by taking in these poor kids, but in reality he abuses them.

I think he might've even been a pedophile? No one knows his secret except the heroine. But she escapes with these children and tries to go back and save the rest of them. I don't quite remember how she meets the hero of the story, but I think he's titled as well and he tries to help out the heroine by formulating a plan since her husband is well-known. Random facts I remember about from this book is that the heroine was also abused by her husband and I think punished by being put in a cage?

Hope that made sense Thanks in advance! Hello all new here as well. I know a knight inherits land but when he gets there its been razed. The cover was all reds with a girl leaning backwards in a beautiful gown with a man holding her i think but i might be blending stories Thank you! Hi klkeefe, I think I read something like that not to long ago though it wasn't medieval but more Regency.

But it rings a bell. Not sure if I'm not mixing up two books though. It sounds a little like Fairest of them All by Theresa Medeiros, but I don't think the plot points all match up. The heroine is a beauty in disguise, but I don't remember the land being razed. I have been searching for a contemporary romance novel for years.

The heroine thinks she is dating a guy but he is an FBI agent? I believe she is a secretary and it looks as if her boss is involved in baby smuggling or some other type of illegal activity. She is taken down to the police station, in front of everyone at work I believe and the young brash agent along with his older much more mature partner question her for hours. The brash agent even scares her by mentioning having to go into witness protection. They are apparently holding her long enough so they can install a wire tap in her house.

When she meets up with him the hero who wants revenge against this man kidnaps her and gets shot in the process. February 13, Steven Varni. The role that immigrant and first generation Italian women played in the workforce before is not well-documented. Aside from such dramatic and February 6, Testing out a new caffettiera! Savona: Piazza Mameli. Nonna Carmela's Stuffed Mushrooms. June 29, Adelinda Allegretti. L'Accademia di Belle Arti di Sadun Tessuti ebraici in mostra agli Uffizi.

June 28, Fabrizio del Bimbo. Red Carpet. Wertmuller sulla Walk of Fame. Franco Zeffirelli, genio ed eccellenza. Evelina Frisa. Grand Tour. Nel Fermano tra i borghi pittoreschi. Fabrizio Del Bimbo. Sulle spiagge sabbiose di Gallipoli. Laura Rossi. L'arte contemporanea incontra il Chianti L'Italia e il mondo di domani Quantum Computing: collaborazione Ita-Us. Politecnico di Milano tra le top Impresa Italia. In Usa l'export del food parmense Mattarella: Ustica, tragedia indelebile.