Manual Duos of Domination - Two Tales of Erotic Female Superiority - Book Two

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  2. Acknowledgments
  3. Duos of Domination - Two Tales of Erotic Female Superiority - Book One
  4. Men, Women and God(s)

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A total geek at her core, when she is not writing, she adores attending the latest comic con or spending time with her family. She currently lives in the Midwest with her two furry felines. His plans for the week include indulging in the finer points of life — mainly sex, and lots of it. That all changes when he literally runs into Jenna. Lips he can imagine on various parts of his body. Carter devises a plan to claim the feisty woman. But will he be able to keep it strictly physical, or will her surrender to his touch affect him in unexpected ways? Email the proof of purchase receipt or screenshot to anya anyasummers.

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Good luck with the tour! Victoria March 6, at pm Sounds like a great book! Copyright Deborah A. To idealize the loved one might look as a form of great love and devotion, which however implies the incestuous bond with the parent loved and mythicized in childhood. Only the gradual acceptance of the troubling extraneousness of the other, unravels the injunction of the Castle of the Forced Love. Children do not choose parents, it is a kind of forced love that is necessary to grow up; girls and boys normally love and idealize them in childhood, while maturity requires that children work the loss of this ideal.

The incest taboo marks a boundary between parents and descendants, so that we can understand that time flows irreversibly, to make possible the separation between generations and their alternation, with the fertility that renews life. The female and male filial actants need to gain experience of their mutual desire, risking loosing each other. The Beast is afraid that Beauty will not come back to him, but he lets her go, while Beauty is afraid that the Beast died for her fault, and to save him accepts to marry him in spite of his ugliness.

In the northwest quadrant the moon of the main female actant lights the Paternal Mountains, and here we find very close daughters and fathers, be they king, merchants or villains, and fairy tales that flow from this relation. In the 16 th century collection by Straparola we find Doralice , the prototype of Donkey Skin , the female main actant of which has to run away from her incestuous father.

In the 17 th century collection Tale of Tales by Giambattista Basile we find two fairy tales of this type, The She-Bear and Penta the Handless The incestuous king of this last story would marry his sister. In Perrault 's tale and in many following popular Italian version the main female actant imposes on her father to provide her with wonderful dresses that give her the brightness of the sun and the grace and beauty of the sea.

Her father always gives her what she asked, making her nearly a goddess of nature.

Acknowledgments

Not to marry her father, the daughter must then run away, covered with the skin of an animal. The animal in Perrault 's version is a donkey, in the English tradition it is a cat, in other version we can find a wood-dress, or the skin of a dead woman, who died hundred years old. Together with the wonderful gowns, which the daughter secretly keeps, the repulsive skin veils and unveils the incestuous love. This clearly incestuous fairy tale shows the character of the northwest quadrant, a father who imposes himself on his daughter, and a daughter who cannot do her life because she is bound to her father.

The first love of every girl is her father, and if she does not stop keeping him as her ideal lover, she will not be able to love a human being, who can never correspond to an ideal image. There are then fairy tales characterized by a metaphorical incest, like Rot-Eyes and Beauty and the Beast. In this stories a father loves his daughter so much that he risks his life to pick a rose for her; the daughter loves him so much that she is ready to offer her life to save her father.

The love ideal is so strong that the transformation and the happy ending come just after a long closeness with the opposite of the ideal, the Beast. This incest gives the riddle par excellence, and since the solver marquis is not able to solve it, the main female actant gets freedom for her father. In The Lost Doll the main female actant is the beloved daughter of a king who suddenly dies. She loses her father and the doll that she always kept near herself, and her happy ending cannot come if she does not find out her doll.

This doll means here the ideal image of the princess, a part of her identity that she needs to grow up. A prince has found the lost doll, and fell in love with this ideal image; the princess find her lost doll with him, and they get happily married. In the tale of Sweet Diamond Pie the main female actant loves so much her ideal partner that she does not leave her father's house.

Then she gets from her merchant father the ingredients to make a man of her taste. In the tale of Violet the main actant demands to be an ideal for her prince, and escaping all his attacks she arouses his desire. She leads a courteous cunning game that however would not be enough to get a happy ending.

Duos of Domination - Two Tales of Erotic Female Superiority - Book One

As well as in every fairy tale of this quadrant, the ideal needs to confront itself with its opposite, that here is an ogre. This clumsy ingenuous creature adopts the cunning beautiful Violet, and this combination of opposites is the ingredient that every fairy tale in this quadrant needs to reach an happy ending. Finding a fairy tale on the web is very easy.

We open a search engine website, then we write the title, Cinderella for example, and we get a list of a hundred or a thousand links. We never explore them all; we stop at the first three or four web-pages. There we find indications for some sites containing a famous version of the tale, usually simplified, often complete with illustrations or glittering movies. Then we find links for films, movies and live action, and for theater performances. We can find out — if we do not already know it - that Rossini composed an opera, La Cenerentola , up to now represented in many opera seasons.

But we probably do not know anything about Cat Cinderella , the first amazing version of this tale, published in Naples in the 17 th century. It is ulikely to find these at the top of a web search , unless we look for them specifically. This would require prior knowledge of the existence of this heritage. Nevertheless, these tales are freely available on the web, but it is nearly impossible to find them if we are not already expert on this subject. Well, one of the main principles guiding our project to build Fabulando , as well as our choice of different narrative means, is to provide easy access to numberless fairy tales available online in many versions.

There are count less collections of ancient and classical tales, written in local dialects or in national languages, which remain unknown. There is another principle guiding our work. We love the beautiful old books of fairy tales, we enjoy their charm, page after page, image after image, surprise after surprise, and we believe that it is possible to get this pleasure also by digital means, like our Fabulando e-books. Fabulando tells all the Sixty-seven tales of its collection - in an e-book, a digital book that however has the colours and the rustling of a paper book, and the finest illustrations of the great artists of the 19 th and early 20 th centuries.


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  6. We told almost every fairy tale in two e-books, including the tale in the original language and the facing translation in the languages we chose, Italian, that is our mother tongue, and English, which is now the international language. We drew the original language versions from the major collections available online; the Italian dialectal fairy tales come from 19 th and early 20 th century collections, the ancient fairy tales come from 14 th , 16 th and 17 th century Italian collections, the European tales come from the collections written by Charles Perrault , the Grimm Brothers , and others.

    The e-books of these four sections bear the following titles on their covers: 1.

    Naughty Stories ( Erotic XXXMAS )

    People of Wonders. Italian Dialectal Fairy Tales 2. Europa in fabula. Migrant Stories.

    Men, Women and God(s)

    Tales without Borders The e-books have an end page with the sources of original language and translated versions, of illustrations and headletters and of the ancient geographic maps; there is then a link on this page to get the general Bibliography of Fabulando , with the links to fairy tale collections available online. E-kamishibai is the word we use in Fabulando drawing on the word e-book. It spread throughout Japan in the period between the World Wars, when the kamishibaya , who were storytellers, went along the streets of the towns by a bicycle, equipped with a little wood theatre. The kamishibaya told his tales scrolling through this little theatre a set of illustrations.

    Everybody could stop and listen to the tale, but the kamishibaya reserved the first rows of seats to children who bought the kamishibaya's candies before the show. B rightly coloured illustrations slid in the little theatre and greatly impressed the public. It was a real picture storytelling, animated by the kamishibaya's voice and gestures. In Fabulando many illustrations come from the work of Walter Crane who retold through images many popular fairy tales.

    We imitated the Japanese kamishibai and adapted it to the digital media, reworking these illustrations to get a wider set of images. We retold Puss in Boots and The Frog Prince also through movies that we realized reworking illustrations of Walter Crane that enchanted us with their beauty, their expressive power and their intelligence. We inserted some captions to make the tales understandable, following the finesse, the humour and the rhythm that are typical of folk tales, then we wrote our captions in rhymes.

    We made their font inspired by the captions of a very famous silent movie, The Thief of Bagdad US, We would like to say something else about Puss in Boots. We inserted this tale, well known throughout the world, among our European fairy tales, but we chose to rework the first version of Puss in Boots published in the world La Gatta , available on the website Adalinda Gasparini, Psicoanalisi e favole. It belongs to the 16 th century collection The Facetious Nights by Giovan Francesco Straparola, and it tells of a madam cat.

    Nevertheless, we chose to realize our movie starting from the first charming version , which is less known. The version of Cinderella told by the Authors has a special place in Fabulando. Besides an e-book and an e-kamishibai, the map of this fairy tale gives access to an iPad app that we realized disassembling and re-assembling the illustrations by Arthur Rackham and retelling the story from the versions by Giambattista Basile , by Charles Perrault , by Walt Disney and by the folk Florentine version La Cenerentola Imbriani , Our app is entirely devoted to Cinderella, and every page consists of a written text, a little movie and a narrating voice.

    There is also an original soundtrack. About our Greek and Latin translations: we wanted to pay tribute to our classical culture, that upheld across the millennia its generative flow in thought and narrative, up to contemporary storytelling. To download this app go to the Map of the Tale ; other news about it are also available.

    There are two little e-books in Fabulando where the Frog himself The Frog Prince and the Cat herself Puss in Boots tell the key points of the story of their tales. Every fairy tale has an interesting history that could highlight its links with other tales and other cultural forms, like literature and cinema.

    We chose the stories of these two tales for their great storytellers the Grimm Brothers and Charles Perrault respectively and for the charm of the histories of these stories. The history of Puss in Boots arouses curiosity because of its gender changes. In nearly one and a half century, a she-cat, inherited by the main actant from his mother, becomes a she-cat inherited from the father, and then a he-cat that the protagonist inherits from his father. In the e-book we try to understand why the last version prevailed, becoming the tale that everybody knows.

    On the other side, The Frog Prince , in the version by the Grimm Brothers , shows its deep bonds with medieval literature. The main female actant, Cianna, wishes to find her seven brothers who left their home when she was born, due to an oversight of their mother's midwife.

    The sister finally finds her brothers that are in service of a misogynous ogre. The happiness of their encounter does not last for a long time, because the seven brothers turn into seven little pigeons, due to a mistake of Cianna. She then decides to find the way to make her brothers human again. To do this she must find the house where Time lives, because he knows the secret of this metamorphosis. Along her hard long journey, Cianna listens to creatures asking for her help and giving her precious instructions to get the house of Time.

    Then she reaches her goal: she makes her brothers human again and grants the wishes of the creatures that she met along her way. The same creatures help her and her brothers again to overcome some hurdles on their way back. This tale may be one of the most beautiful fairy tales written by Basile , both for its complex and coherent plot and for the fairy tale's ethics that it clearly displays: the main actant frees herself by freeing others, every other creature she meets along the way.

    Il Gran Basile presents in this fairy tale a long interesting list of predators and little birds, told by the seven brothers of Cianna to reproach her after their metamorphosis. This fairy tale has a female main actant and starts with an implicit maternal injunction, so we find it in the South West quadrant. Its injunction is the Labyrinth of the Impossible Commitment , since Cianna chooses by herself to make amends for the involuntary mess due to her and her mother's oversights.

    Jesus and his Apostles arrive to the house of Smithy Menico , travelling incognito. Jesus sends St. Peter to beg for something and the poor smith gives him one coin. Then He sends St. Paul, and the smith gives him another coin. The third time Jesus himself goes an ask alms, and Smithy Menico gives him his third and last coin.

    Whith his three coins he could buy some bread, a cigar and the oil for his lamp, and he has nothing more, so he can neither light his room, nor smoke a cigar, nor something to dine. But Jesus sends again Saint Peter to the smith to grant three desires of his. Smithy Menico does not ask wealth, palaces or youth; he asks that his violin, his stool, and his fig tree get magic powers.

    Some time passes, and Death and Devil come one after another to take him, but Smithy Menico blocks them by his magic gifts and by his slyness. This main actant fulfils the impossible human aim par excellence, since Death or Devil cannot take him. After a very long life, the smith decides to go and see the Hereafter, but St. Peter bans him from entering heaven, saying that Smithy Menico wasted the Lord's gift, because he did not ask for the eternal salvation for his soul. Then the Angels of purgatory to reject him, and Smithy Menico knock on the hell's doors.

    The devil who met him on the earth then advises all the devils to keep out Smithy Menico, because he is much more evil than themselves. Smithy Menico goes now back to the heaven's doors, and taking advantage of a distraction of St. Peter, he throws his jacket inside, and sits on it. In other fairy tales it is told of actants who do not fear anything, nor death.

    The actant of one of these tales is Dauntless Little John , who is not afraid because he simply does not know death: for this reason, he dies as soon as he sees his own shadow. The actant of another tale, Little John and the Shudder , does not know death, but he feels that he misses something, and goes around the world looking for shudder.

    See a Problem?

    He happens to marry a princess, but the happy ending only comes when he finally feels goose bumps. Smithy Menico knows very well death, and he is so scared, that he chooses his three magic gifts to become able to win it. Smithy Menico is a laic parable as well as a fairy tale; telling that overcoming death and fear is an impossible commitment.

    But it tells also that one can try to get it, and if he succeeds, he is free from any masters, here and in the hereafter. He is neither alive nor dead, neither forgiven nor guilty. He represents the eternal human desire to cross his boundaries. Peter represents during the whole tale the antagonist paternal character, disapproving the choices of our cunning fellow Smithy Menico. The injunction of this tale is the Labyrint of the Impossible Commitment. The sapper cockroach changes the royal alcove into a sickening place, and the second night the defence of the bridegroom, who barricades his orifice with a trench of bands, clothes and underpants, is useless.

    If the cockroach cannot enter like the first night, the mouse steps up, and gnawing at the trench he opens a breach for him, so that the insect,. The bride being tainted with such odour awoke, and sighting the orange deluge which had coloured the white Holland sheets to Venetian tabby, holding her nose, flew to the chamber of her handmaidens. The wretched bridegroom, calling the valets, loudly and at length lamented his misfortune, that through a lax foundation the greatness of his house would be closed ibid. To prepare himself for the third night, the bridegroom blocks his orifice with a custom made wood plug, resolving to stay up not to lose control.

    Now the cricket takes action, send ing the German groom to sleep with his sweet singing , but the mouse, find ing a barrage that he cannot open with his teeth, cannot make way for the cockroach. Then the mouse goes to the larder and dips his tail into a jar of mustard, and then he rubs his tail several times under the nose of the bridegroom,. And she screamed and screeched, and at her screams the king ran in, and enquired of her what ailed her. She told him that a petard had been shot at her breast.

    And the king marvelled with excessive marvel at such a folly, and wondered how a petard on her chest she could speak; and lifting the bed-clothes, he found the bran mine, and the petard's stopper which had hit the bride, and made a good mark in her breast; although I know not which caused her more disgust, the stink of the powder, or the blow from the ball ibid. Then the king chases away the German nobleman. The king gets upset thinking that that disaster came from his unfair death sentence, and misses the innocent Nardiello. T he three little magic animals promptly come to cheer him up, telling him that the legitimate pretender is alive and that they are ready to go and get him.

    Then they turn him into a handsome youth, worthy husband of the princess, and all live happily ever after. Let us think that he deserved it, because he acknowledged the failure of his upbringing. Otherwise Nardiello would not have set off and found his own way, getting something that his father could not even dream. Basile devotes more than one third of this tale to the scatological war operation of the three little animals, who act for the sake of Nardiello, who loves them and takes care of them.

    Th ey return his love leading him to conquer the princess and defeat all his opponents. Art wins over common sense, personified by the merchant father, and the German nobleman, who makes use of doctors and counsellors, also military ones — a young bombardier suggests the wood plug -, and the power personified by the king. It happens in this fairy tale, and goes on happening every time we read and enjoy it. Italy has, with Lo cunto de li cunti or Pentamerone by Basile, the most ancient, rich and artistic book of fairy tales, by mutual consent of the foreign critics who know this subject.

    Croce, in: Basile , ; our translation. V; our translation. Introducing his collection Italian Folktales , published in , Calvino had written:. Basile's work resembles the dream of a hideous Neapolitan Shakespeare, obsessed with the horrible, so that ogres and witches are never enough, with a taste for the tortuous grotesque image, where the sublime mingles with the coarse and the sordid. Calvino , vol. By his analogy with Shakespeare, Calvino seizes the amazing linguistic skill of Basile, which reaches one of its peaks in th is fairy tale's operation of the three little artist animals.

    He moves to perfection his juggler tools, mingling scatological, sexual, military languages, and then he ends his amazing performance with some lines of Francesco Petrarca. The amazing writer provokes laughter and admiration, bringing on the stage the infinite resources of the language. Tale of Tales is a Neapolitan work, and its language is today nearly incomprehensible even in Neaples, but its influence on the Italian and European fairy-tale imagination testifies to its universal value. As for the adjective hideous , we agree with Italo Calvino on condition that we think as hideous the human being too.

    From Basile's baroque point of view life usually mingles together the sublime and the coarse. Moreover, we can feel Basile close to us thanks to his irreducible complexity, which reflects our weakened identity, because no salvific ideology looks now able to ensure us. We can feel ourselves exiled and delegitimized like Nardiello, when we undergo the narcissistic injury coming from the disillusion about our possibility to master ourselves. The ego is not master in its own house , as Freud said.

    But sometimes it happens that in our exile - namely away from the house of our origin - we can fall in love with a doll, like the main actant of Pooavola Doll , or with three little animals artist. We can face the risk of following our own desire, which seldom agrees with common sense, and is unavoidably divergent from our social and parental injunctions. The dreamer writer Giambattista Basile did not get a throne like Nardiello, nor did his art make his life easy. However, he endowed his creature, The Tale of Tales , with the magic of art, and it has been travelling through time and space, beyond borders that he could not even dream.

    To acknowledge the magic of art means understanding that art is the offspring of human culture, and the only kind of immortality to which a human being can aspire. See also: Lake of Generation. In art alone, it still happens that a man, consumed by his wishes, produces something similar to the gratification of these wishes, and this playing, thanks to artistic illusion, calls forth effects as if it were something real. We rightly speak of the magic of art and compare the artist with a magician. But this comparison is perhaps more important than it claims to be.

    Freud , , p. Thanks to this magic, the tales by Basile, and Nardiello, the princess, the king and the merchant, live happily forever after, together with the guitar-playing cockroach, the dancing mouse and the singing cricket. What makes this tale so peculiar, is that the story of the maiden dressed up as a man, travelling around the world, is framed by another story, the tale of the parrot who acts to keep the main actant - a queen - faithful to her king.

    Here we have a tale within another tale, which comes to the oral Italian dialectal storytellers from a faraway oriental origin other versions of this fairy tale were collected in Sicily, Tuscany, Sardinia and Calabria. How could the Piedmontese folk storyteller in the 19 th century know a fairy tale told in an unknown language? We do not know other subsequent variants of this parrot's story, the charm of which is intriguing. What is more interesting for us is that it gives evidence to one of the main magic virtues of the fairy-tale genre: to cross any boundary of time, space, language, and culture.

    They live and flourish thanks to the pen of cultivated writers as well as to the speech of illiterate people, giving us a various and abiding pleasure. The parentage of our dialectal fairy tale with the Indian collection concerns only the frame story, since the tale told by the Piedmontese parrot has nothing to do with the Eastern ancient collection. She happens to cure many cursed princes before finding the prince who is lovesick for her. Leaving aside the parrot's frame story, The Lost Doll is in the northwest quadrant of the Map of Succession, because the main actant is a girl and her journey starts after the loss of her father.

    Because the princess lack s any mean of survival, her fairy tale begins with the injunction of the Marsh of the Dereliction. This doll was made exactly like her, with her same features and height, so that she, having no mother or siblings, could have a playfellow.

    In her dereliction, when nobody can take care of her and she cannot take care of anybody, the poor princess embarks for a long journey. She will finally find her doll and somebody to love: her doll is in the closet of a prince, who had fallen in love and was lovesick with her from the very moment he had seen her doll. Let us now notice something about this fairy tale, travelling together with the princess disguised as a man, who tests a feminine aptitude: to take care of others. Along her way, she treats ill princes cursed by underworld actants, mainly female ones.

    Therefore, this story tells that the princess herself needs to gain experience of the deep link between life and death, to understand how to care the others before, finding her lost doll - her own self. As soon as she discovers it, she meets her prince, and their happy wedding means the par excellence happy and fruitful alliance. We already said that the prince is already in love with her, since when he saw her image, her doll.

    She has no chance to meet him before achieving her journey, during which she tests herself in the powerful plot of illness and recovery, life and death. When the princess has experienced her power to care male illness, she finds herself. A magic Tunafish is caught in the web of Madmatt, the main actant of this fairy tale. Its injunction is the Marsh of dereliction, since the activity of the male main actant depends on his poverty: he is not able to provide a living for himself and his mother.

    You can see their fairy tale in the northeast quadrant, because Madmatt has a male magic helper - the Tunafish - and a powerful antagonist, the king. The Tunafish is a male helper - let us remember also the phallic symbolism of the fish -, and his aid comes from another world; through this encounter, Madmatt can fill the lack of his father, who has passed away. The confrontation with the king then represents Madmatt facing the human law, which he violated magically impregnating the little princess Juliet.

    This fairy tale starts with a prank that repeats itself every day, when Madmatt, coming home in the evening, screams at his mother to take all her containers out to the front of the house so that he can fill them up with his catch. But he never catches anything. Then he makes funny faces, sticking out his incredibly long tongue, triggering the laughter of the little princess, who appears at the window of her castle, angering Madmatt.

    Then, one day, Madmatt, who is ugly, clumsy, and unable to fish anything, catches an enormous tuna, and he sets off towards home, happy to bring with him such a big fish. But the fish speaks, asking Madmatt to release him and arguing that eating him he will not be satisfied in the long run, but only once. Since Madmatt does not free him, the Tunafish promises also to give him a lot of fishes, and to make all his wishes come true. Then Madmatt gives up his need of food and puts the Tunafish back in the water, and following his words he fills up his little boat with so much fish that it nearly sinks.

    But her love for him quickly wins her good sense, and the poor woman hurries up to prepare cans, pans, and dishes that Madmatt finally fills up. Nevertheless, the little princess goes on laughing, and Madmatt does not simply rail against her as he used to do: he runs to the shore and calls the Tunafish, who appears in the blink of an eye, ready to fullfill his desire.

    Madmatt asks the fish to make the princess pregnant with his offspring, and this is said and done. When the father king learns that his little daughter is pregnant, he does not believe her innocence and sentences her to death. However, the queen intercedes on behalf of their daughter, persuading the king to wait for the birth of the child.

    When the baby is born, he is so beautiful that the king decides to wait another year, hoping to find a way to find his unknown father. Then he invites all the men of the city for his grandson's birthday, hoping that the child will naturally recognize his father. But the baby does not go to anybody, until he tries to reach a door, behind which is Madmatt, who is feeling too ashamed to enter the hall. When he is ordered to come in, the baby smiles at him and throws his arms around Madmatt's neck.

    The dismayed king orders to put her daughter, Madmatt and his grandson into a barrel, and throws them into the sea, where they are supposed to quickly die. This is a recurring motif, which reminds us of the Greek myth of Perseus, conceived by the princess Danae with the supernatural love of Zeus. The King is dead, long live the King. The flow of the generations following each other includes ageing and death together with birth and growth. The ancestor, the king, tries to dodge this law of life, sentencing to death his descendant, but he inevitably fails.

    Let us notice that in all myths and fairy tales newborn babies who are abandoned like Perseus always find somebody who rescues them, so that they can grow up beautiful and strong. Moreover, they leave their adoptive parents and return to their unknown parents. Let us now go back to our fairy tale, which was first written in Venice by Giovan Francesco Straparola , then retold by Giambattista Basile in his collection. While Madmatt eats and drinks as if nothing bad could happen, the princess gets upset and is busy calming down their baby, giving him some figs.

    Madmatt answers that they are not in danger at all, because he has a magic helper who will make all his wishes come true. Then the princess asks him to share his magic helper with her, and when the Tunafish appears, the princess asks him to lead them to safety on an islet and to change Madmatt into a beautiful wise youth. Then she asks for a wonderful palace, surrounded by an amazing garden with a tree of golden apples. Leaving aside the tree of the forbidden fruit, which Adam and Eve were quick to taste, we remember in the Greek mythology the golden apples of the garden of the Hesperides.

    Let us remember also another garden visited by Ulysses, belonging to Alcinous, the happy king of the Phaeacians: every tree of this wonderful garden would always give its fruits, in any season. Thinking of Arabic fairy tales, we remember the trees laden with precious stones of every colour that Alaaddin sees in the underground garden where he is looking for the magical lamp.

    See also, about this, Adalinda Gasparini ,, pp. Some years later, the king and the queen, the parents of our princess, were oppressed by melancholy after having lost their only daughter. So they decided to leave for a pilgrimage by ship, and when they saw that amazing palace, shortly after their departure, they went ashore to visit it.

    When their daughter, Madmatt and their child welcame them, they did not recognize them. A golden apple fell into the clothes of the king, and the princess then asked all the guests to prove that they did not steal the precious fruit. When the golden apple fell from his clothes, the dismayed king proclaimed his innocence. Princess Juliet first pretended not to believe him, and then she said:.

    With tears in her eyes Juliet revealed all: "This is the innocent child, born out of no fault of mine, and this is Madmatt, who has become very wise thanks to the power of a fish named Tunafish". A child is the offspring, a bud, a fruit, a gem: the Italian word gemma means both gem and bud , by which the plant reproduces itself. Birth is a mystery, both for believers, who know the reality of a magic pregnancy from the Gospel or from the Hindu poem Mahabharata, and for non-believers, who ought to call mystery what they cannot control and master.

    The king did not give credit to his daughter when she affirmed her innocence; if the queen and his counsellors had not held him back, he would have sentenced her to death as soon as her pregnancy would have become visible. Therefore, he lost his daughter, and his melancholy is the penalty for having at tempted to halt the flow of succession. Then a new king ascends to the throne, another game, and another story can start.

    The defeat of the king is the same defeat of all parents, when they discover the radical alterity of their children, when life takes them away from their control, putting an end to the absolute mastery that they had until that moment exerted. A coincidence would be the total failure for children, because it would be a negation of the difference. Without this difference, that makes unique every human being, no subject could take shape. They can come to terms with it only after a long and hard reflection. In the tale of Madmatt, the king, representing the law, cannot understand magic, just as the king in the fairy tale The Cockroach, the Mouse and the Cricket , because they ignore or condemn whatever goes beyond their mastery.

    In a similar way, the little princess, in a barrel shaken by the waves, gives credit to Madmatt who is telling her that his magic friend will easily lead them to safety. Then she saves herself together with him and their child, conceived with the magical help of the Tunafish. We find other amazing magical pregnancies, e. Surprise, it works! Take that, Ivy League stuffed shirts! The set-up is delightfully promising: A group of once-close friends reunite to finish the epic bar pub crawl they attempted as wild, bright-eyed teens.

    But then the movie soon becomes something quite different, as our heroes are confronted with a hellishly hilarious, gruesome Body Snatchers -type sci-fi scenario — and unlike so many other wild comedic genre twists, this one simultaneously leans into and explodes the idea of learning that things look different from the perspective of age. How about a topless man in bike shorts rolling around on hundreds of mouse traps? Or a dude attempt to snort high-grade, hot-as-hell wasabi sauce?

    Johnny Knoxville and his stunt-drunk band of self-flagellant bros pioneer joyously extreme pre-YouTube gags. If Buster Keaton and Jackie Chan had a baby, that kid would grow up to make this movie. How funny is it to watch a grown man cry? As he and his soon-to-be-married friend Thomas Haden Church venture to California wine country for a bachelor weekend, Sideways develops a sharp buddy-movie dynamic between a pungent misanthrope and a pleasure-seeking horndog.

    This one-time cult curiosity has since spawned two Netflix spinoff series … as well as a legendary DVD audio commentary track that just adds extra fart sounds. Grinches never had a Christmas movie to call their own. We are all John Ritter reaction shots. It proved that an aggressively smart, formally disorienting movie could still let everyone in on the joke. This just in: Precocious teens can be real assholes. Welcome to the darkest of dark comedies — a satire of romance in which the laughs all have serrated edges. Director Yorgos Lanthimos, who previously crafted the bleakly hilarious family drama Dogtooth , introduces us to a future society in which everyone must find a mate or be turned into an animal.

    Colin Farrell is magnificently deadpan as the newly dumped David who goes looking for love in all the wrong places. Gene Hackman plays the neglectful patriarch of a family that includes a resentful ex-wife Anjelica Huston and three children who never lived up to their early potential: a burnt-out athlete Luke Wilson , a failed playwright Gwyneth Paltrow and a paranoid stockbroker Ben Stiller.

    The emotions roiling beneath its colorful surface keep it real. Mel Brooks once noted that parody plays best when it looks like the real thing — a lesson that director Edgar Wright has definitely taken to heart. But in that sliver, the movie finds huge laughs and a delightful sense of small-town anarchy in the U. The fact that it has not dated at all but seems more timely than ever is, frankly, depressing and sad.

    But then you remember that it features puppets having the most pornographic sex imaginable. Fuck yeah! All this, plus a near-perfect turn from Emma Stone. Super, indeed. Thanks to his signature character Alan Partridge, comedian Steve Coogan is an expert at playing a legend in his own mind. But what if the legend lived up to the hype? Who likes understated, black-and-white slice-of-life dramedies that pop with colorful humor and awkward comments? Neither are we. Play this comedy loud. The geniuses behind the Jump Street films transformed what could have been a toy ad into a subversive, thrilling action-comedy that celebrated the power of make-believe while mocking the conformity of corporate culture.

    Equally hilarious and heartfelt, The Lego Movie is a tsunami of sight gags, pop-culture ribbing and killer zingers. Everything is awesome!